What if I oversleep? What will I wear? What will I have for lunch? Will my friends be there?  Sound familiar? Thought I was talking about a child? Nope. Teachers have anxiety too.

 I used to practice getting up on time. For. Two. Weeks. I set two alarms, one by the bed and one in the bathroom. Just to be sure.  I laid out my clothing. Set my breakfast, ready to eat, in the fridge.  Even went as far as laying my toothbrush by the sink. A little overboard? Maybe, but the thought of oversleeping and being late terrified me. Needless to say, I didn't sleep much the first few weeks of school.

Over the years, I dropped the get-up-get-ready drills and simply let the alarm clock do it's thing.  I also perfected my organizational skills and got clothes and food ready in advance. I continued having cooking marathons. Preparing meals over the end-of-summer to be ready for the back-to-school fatigue.  I knew that I would be tired in the evenings and need to have some meals ready to go.

Preparation. That's the key to relieving anxiety.  There is nothing worse than trying to get something ready while the clock is ticking. Like those surprise, "Mom, I need my uniform washed before we leave for school" statements (yeah, some of those are still going to occur).  Or, coming home to discover that your husband has invited a friend over? Life is full of surprises. You can't avoid everything or, for that matter, be prepared for everything, but you can be prepared for the normal day-to-day occurrences.

So... here are a few tips from an over the top organizer!

1. Check out these recipes on my Pinterest board- Meal Ideas!   I've tried the No Bake Chocolate Oat Bars, Mexican Stuffed Shells, super easy peach cobbler, my variation of Poor Man's Stew, some of the chicken recipes (baked garlic brown sugar),  and the 1 pound ground meat with 1 packet of dry French onion soup mix (no name on pin!). They are delicious- Kim tested, husband approved!  Since, I've made them over the summer, they are easier and quicker for me to prepare now.





2.  Try organizing your kitchen. I know that with kids (or husbands) it isn't easy. It is also time-consuming, but in the long-run it pays off.  My pantry is organized by type (vegetable, fruit, cereal, etc). All of the breakfast items are in one easy to see and access location. All can labels are facing out so I can read them. I keep a magnetic shopping list on fridge. I try to keep all recipe staples on hand.


3. Try to keep some mix-&-match outfits in your closet. I like the kind that are wash & wear (hate to iron!!!). I also like the tops (or bottoms) that will go with more than one other item. That way, if I put on something that doesn't fit anymore :( or needs repair, I can easily swap it out for something else. I've updated my Teacher's Life board to include meals, organization tips, and teaching ideas (anything that fell into the make-it-easier-during-the-school-year category).







4. Find a place to post your schedules, as well as, your own. Post them in a high traffic area with important dates highlighted. I carry my planner everywhere! I have all of our dates marked in it with some reminders posted a day or two in advance. May sound crazy, but it beats having to explain to the dentist why you didn't show up for your appointment.

5. Accept that things will not be perfect. Do what you do with your heart and then leave it there. You may burn supper (I do frequently) or a lesson plan may fail and that is ok. Life goes on. Find your mix and let it work for you.  Make sure that you save some time for yourself. You can't be your best when you are running on empty!

Now, let's set those alarms and make this the best year ever!






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This blog does not share personal information with third parties nor do I store any information about your visit to this blog other than to analyze and optimize your content and reading experience through the use of cookies. You can turn off the use of cookies at anytime by changing your specific browser settings. I am not responsible for republished content from this blog on other blogs or websites without my permission. This privacy policy is subject to change without notice and was last updated on June 5, 2015. If you have any questions feel free to contact me directly at kimberlyfrencken@gmail.com


 As a teacher, I footed the bill for classroom supplies. I supplied markers, crayons, glue, pencils, pens, paper,  highlighters, and just about anything else that I thought was necessary for teaching my kids. No, I'm not wealthy. Not even close, but I decided what I needed and figured it into my budget.   If I couldn't afford it, I didn't buy it. If I didn't have it, I found a way to teach without it. My original back-to-school supply list consisted of:  pencils, one black or blue pen, paper, and 3-ring binder. The list eventually dwindled to pencil and paper.  I never specified brand. I never specified an amount over one. When parents asked about the type of binder that I wanted, my reply was any type that would allow their child to keep track of assignments (back in the good 'ole days when we actually wrote on paper).  I suggested one binder for all of their core classes and use dividers to keep the classes separate, rather than buy a different binder for each class. Buying numerous binders was an unnecessary expense. I could almost tell you word-for-word the conversations that I've had with parents over the years because on Open House night I spoke to the parents of over 150 kids. The words are burned in my memory.  I tried to be aware of the expense for parents. I picked up supplies throughout the school year at close-outs, sales,  yard sales, and discount stores. I was always on the look-out for supplies.

So this week, when I joined in a back-to-school shopping experience, my eyes were opened at how... well,...  crazy things have become. I had a list for a kindergartener. The list was long. The list was specific by amount and name brand.  Expensive name brands. Not just one or two of things. Quantities of three, four, twelve! I was told that the list was long and the quantities high so that parents who purchased supplies would also provide extras for students who didn't bring supplies.

I realize that teachers cannot supply every article for every student. I don't expect them to. I don't think anyone does. Teachers spend $100s or $1000s of their own each year on their classroom.  There has to be a way to provide what is needed without breaking the teacher's or the parent's bank.

For starters make the list reasonable. Don't use a suggested list or list that another teacher uses. Think through your plans and determine what your students will need. Not things on a wish list, but things that your kids will really use in the school year.  Secondly, keep the list size minimal.  A long list is not only expensive, but it is also overwhelming.   Specifying large quantities of items and specific name brands puts undo pressure on parents.  Store brands are often just as good as expensive name brands.  Thirdly, find out what supplies your school will supply. For example our school supplied basic colors of dry erase markers. If I wanted purple or pink that would be at my own expense.  Next, ask your parent organization if they are providing any supplies. Some parent organizations will supply basics like pencils, paper, or glue.  Quantities may be limited, but they may be available. Prepare a letter for parents explaining what is needed in the classroom and how it will be used. Even though I taught in a school district that had many students from low socio-economic backgrounds there was always someone willing to help out. They may have offered 100 pencils or 10 boxes of tissues. But I was grateful for each thing offered. Reach out to your community. Corporations may donate pens or pencils with their logo on them.  Manufacturers  may donate a product that they produce, like markers.  And, lastly, dig through your left-over supplies (if there are any) and see what can be recycled for this year.  Parents you can help by offering gently used supplies that are no longer in use at home. Play Dough that your kids are tired of, old crayons, slightly used erasers. Even though items are used, they can still be useful. School supplies don't have to be brand-new.

Going back-to-school shouldn't be a wildly expensive event. There are cost-effective ways to supply the classroom without burdening either the teacher or the parent.  And you might run out of something before the year ends. Been there, done that!  Partnering with parents before school starts with a well-defined list can help get your school year off to a good start.



Cost friendly, effective thorough resources - Which can be purchased using a school purchase order for an individual or a school.


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This blog does not share personal information with third parties nor do I store any information about your visit to this blog other than to analyze and optimize your content and reading experience through the use of cookies. You can turn off the use of cookies at anytime by changing your specific browser settings. I am not responsible for republished content from this blog on other blogs or websites without my permission. This privacy policy is subject to change without notice and was last updated on June 5, 2015. If you have any questions feel free to contact me directly at kimberlyfrencken@gmail.com


Time for back to school.... well, almost. I may be pushing it for some districts. Sorry! I know that the last thing you want is to be reminded that your days of ignoring the alarm clock and free of grading papers are almost over. But..... Well... there is just no gentle way to say this. Summer is almost over. And, school is going to start. You can't stop it from coming.  Each day brings the annual event a little closer.  So, you might as well be prepared. It will actually help to free up some time during the school year and make things easier.

You want to create literacy centers?  Great idea!! Get started now. Literacy centers are priceless. They have many uses and can help to keep your students actively engaged and learning.  Check out my Pinterest board with hundreds of literacy center pins. You might just find a project that is perfect for you.



Looking for some great meals? I like to be organized and prepared. I've even had week-end cooking marathons to make sure that meals for the entire week were prepared. This isn't always possible since week-ends can be busy too so I like to have a few meals that are quick to prepare and clean up.  One-skillet or crockpot meals are my favorite go-tos for nights when I drag in the door and have a million things to do.  Look at these meal ideas for something new to change up your school-year menus. I've tried the easy peach cobbler (more than once). My husband loves it! And, it literally takes very little time to make and it bakes while we eat supper. Win-Win!
P.S. You can tell that I really like pasta! :).



And, while I'm on Pinterest.... look at this cute little fellow just waiting to join your classroom this fall!
All About Apples!


Why not follow my TpT store before school starts??? It would be a great way to get notices on new products and  sales with an email sent directly to you! 
Click here, Chocolate 4 Teachers, and then click on the green star! 



Privacy Policy
This blog does not share personal information with third parties nor do I store any information about your visit to this blog other than to analyze and optimize your content and reading experience through the use of cookies. You can turn off the use of cookies at anytime by changing your specific browser settings. I am not responsible for republished content from this blog on other blogs or websites without my permission. This privacy policy is subject to change without notice and was last updated on June 5, 2015. If you have any questions feel free to contact me directly at kimberlyfrencken@gmail.com


I recently read that every time you yawn your brain is cooled and stimulated. Sounds like a scientific oxymoron. Let's face it, if my brain were stimulated, it would be smokin' hot, and if yawning is cooling things down.. my brain would be the Antarctic.  I'm not sure what function yawning serves, except to remind me that sleep is vital.

Being exhausted is nothing new for me. Just ask my parents or my husband and they will tell you that I seem to always be tired. Nothing medically wrong- I've checked. Yet, I seem to be eternally exhausted. Well... maybe that is an exaggeration, but I am tired. A lot.  I know that reading that extra chapter doesn't help. And, I know that working on my computer past bedtime is a big 'no-no'.

I really don't think I suffer from physical exhaustion, but rather mental. I think too much.  My wheels are constantly turning. Ideas are spinning around in my mind. And... I'm exhausted. There isn't enough time in the world for me to complete everything I'm thinking about. Not even half. And, then you add to it the wear and worry of day-to-day living and what do you have? One exhausted lady!

I know that worry gets me nowhere, but that doesn't stop me from being, let's say, concerned about things.  When I taught public school I regularly worried about my kids. And, new teaching trends. And, new administrators. And, new laws affecting my evaluations, my income, or my retirement. I had the bases covered. If it was worry-worthy (nothing really is, by the way) it was on my mind. Even little things took up precious brain space.

Fast forward a few years and I'm still in education just a different grade level. Now, I teach adults in a private institution. Adults. Fewer things to worry about, right? Wrong. Just different things. Did I explain this well enough?  Am I being fair? Why weren't they in class?  What will they do when they graduate? Not my problem you might say. Okay, not all of it, but that doesn't stop  me from being... concerned.  Also, I'm not full time. I love that and I hate that. I love the freedom and the days off and the lack of meetings. I hate that I don't have some job security.  Recent cutbacks have made me wonder what would I do if adjuncts were no longer needed. My first perky answer is,"God has always taken care of me and provided for me and He will continue to do that!" But in the back of my mind, I still wonder how He will provide for me.  I've talked to enough family and friends to know that this is normal, but it is exhausting.

So, why am I exhausted?  Well.. aren't you exhausted just from reading this and being reminded of your own exhaustions? Do you lie awake at night worried about students, family, bills? Do you worry about the challenges that the future will bring? Do you think of things that you need to do or want to do? Do you bolt out of bed at 3 am remembering that you didn't fix the coffee pot? If so, than you are exhausted too.

I suppose I could manage my thought process better and my time. I could work on more of a schedule and manage my time better (shh... don't tell my husband). I hate time. I don't wear a watch.  Time is the thief of creativity. Sounds good. But, if I really was truthful I would admit that if I could put things in perspective and prioritize them and had more faith than I would be less tired. If  I had a fix-what-I-can-fix-and-let-go-of -what-I-can't philosophy, life would be less stressful and worrisome. IF. If I had less stress and more time I wouldn't be exhausted. Or would I? I think that I would just find more to do and  more to think about.


                                     Triple Chocolate!

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Need some help with creating a literacy center? This resource will create a complete year-long literacy center.
Amazing Animals Complete Literacy Center




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Privacy Policy
This blog does not share personal information with third parties nor do I store any information about your visit to this blog other than to analyze and optimize your content and reading experience through the use of cookies. You can turn off the use of cookies at anytime by changing your specific browser settings. I am not responsible for republished content from this blog on other blogs or websites without my permission. This privacy policy is subject to change without notice and was last updated on June 5, 2015. If you have any questions feel free to contact me directly at kimberlyfrencken@gmail.com



What is a grade? Do they represent what a student is capable of doing? Or do they stand for nothing more than a letter of the alphabet? 

During my last years in public education there was a growing practice of standards based grading. If I heard it once, I heard it a million times, "As and Bs don't mean anything. You have to attach meaning to a grade. Standards based grading will attach meaning."  I never met anyone that could explain how assigning an 'M' was more meaningful than an 'A'. In my situation the ones telling us that we had to use standards based grading understood it far less than those of us using it.  In fact, the more we understood it, the more we realized what a nightmare that it was. 

Let me back up and explain how it was implemented from my perspective.  Two people heard about standards based grading. They thought that it sounded good. It sounded easier. So... they began a campaign to bring our school, and ultimately our district, to the common ground of 'Ms' and 'Is'. These two could already see their names on PowerPoint presentations touting their intelligence at discovering standards based grading.  The problem, they didn't 'invent' standards based grading, only devised a different system. There was confusion and this was just a pilot group. Parents and students complained. School board members asked that the plan be dropped until it was solid. Unfortunately for us, and the students, our administrators and the staff member manipulated their way into another school year.  And, this time they took all of us prisoner.  

Here's the 'brain-child' in a nutshell:
- Students have an unspecified amount of time to turn in an assignment. Due dates are outdated and actually hinder progress, therefore an assignment given in August could be turned in as late as May. 
- Students only have to demonstrate mastery (M) on one assignment. If the teacher assigns 10 under one CCSS category, the student only has to choose one and demonstrate mastery. 
- Assignments are grouped by CCSS  (common core state standards)
- Teachers are to select only the CCSS that they feel are the most worthy to be taught - hence, the "I Can" statements. 
Do you see where this is going? Okay, stay with me. 
-during grade reporting periods and conferences only report on what has been turned in. Everything is a work in progress. If a student has not turned in an assignment, there is insufficient evidence to determine mastery. Don't tell them their child is failing. They still have until May to complete one assignment and achieve mastery.  Just tell parents that there is insufficient evidence to determine how their child is doing. 
You can't make this stuff up! I know. I lived it for two long years. 
Now, image how a reading (or math or science) teacher would feel about facing a parent and telling them that they really aren't sure how their child is doing in school because they have insufficient evidence. What?!!?  Exactly. Not only was I frustrated, but now I was made to look like I didn't know how to teach or assess student progress.

How did the students respond? They loved it at first. No assignment is due. They could pick and choose what they wanted to do. School was a social time. Then they hated it. Really! The students began asking for assignments and they began asking for their grades. They wanted "real grades" - their words not mine. 
And, I began a rebellion of sorts. I was tired of overpaid administrators that hadn't worked in education in years suddenly appearing on the scene telling me how to assess and teach my kids. I was angry that new hires without a teaching degree were making up new educational trends, when they didn't know what to do when the power went off. And, most of all I was sick of what it was doing to my kids.  So... I gradually went back to my method, but I was sneaky. And, to prove a point neither administrator had a clue what I was doing. They didn't know that I wasn't using their method. Does that tell you how little they actually understood it?  I started providing both online and paper assignments. My kids asked for hard copies. They were sick of everything being one-to-one. Of course 1-to-1 sounded great. Successful implementation of Standards -Based grading which embraced the new Common Core Standards sounded cutting edge. We were leading the educational way for the state and according to the education secretary, the nation, when in truth we were not teaching and not meeting the educational needs of our students. It was all a farce. 

So this is my compromise (something that I had used for several years with no parent or student complaints). Before deciding on this, I researched several models of standards based grading. I wanted to stay in compliance to my district by following standards based grading, but I wanted a tested-proven method that would benefit my students.  This is my combination of many successful models. 

- Organize the standards according to the educational needs of my students. For example: before they can comprehend, they need to know how to read informational text and understand the vocabulary. 
- After selecting the main standards that we would emphasize for the quarter, I would select those that fit under the main categories. For example: Under vocabulary, I placed figurative language, affixes, and context clues. 
- Design sequential lessons that earn a number. I gave the 'Ms' a value of 4 and worked my way down from there. 
- Give due dates. Yes, in the real world we have due dates, so students might as well get used to them. And, before moving on to a more difficult concept they have to demonstrate mastery of the previous level.  
- No more pick and choose what I want to do. Students were given an assignment and expected to complete it within a given amount of time. Those who didn't score a 4 received remediation and those who did received enrichment. We all kept moving forward at our own pace. 
- Scores were averaged to determine what the overall score would be.  For instance in vocabulary a students earned a 4 on figurative language identification lesson one, a 3 on identification lesson two, a 3 on interpretation lesson one, a 2 on interpretation lesson two,  and a 4 on interpretation lesson three. Their overall score would be a 3.2. In the grade book I would record an 'AM'- approaching mastery. In my book they still needed to show me that they could identify and interpret figurative language. 

To me the whole situation was a gigantic disaster. What is the difference between an 'A' and an 'M'? Both have meaning as long as teachers assign and communicate what their significance is. If I assigned a B or an AM without telling the student that I wanted them to continue their practice until they completely understood the concept, I would be at fault. Regardless of what letter is used, it is up to us to make it meaningful. It is our responsibility to use a grading system that will hold students accountable and encourage them to achieve. Systems that allow students to be lazy or fail have no place in the educational system.  What a grade represents is what we attach to it. Not communicating an expectation, even if it is simply a due date, is allowing our students to fail. It is not preparing them for the real world.  Whether the student earns an F or an INS (insufficient evidence) is irrelevant if they can't read when they graduate. 


Almost time to think about back-to-school!  
Stop in my TpT shop, Chocolate 4 Teachers
for reading resources to make planning a breeze! 




Everything you need to create a year-long nonfiction literacy center !


It is never too soon to stock up on reading or sub resources!



Want to look at previews of all my resources?   Go to my Pinterest Board, Chocolate 4 Teachers 






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This blog does not share personal information with third parties nor do I store any information about your visit to this blog other than to analyze and optimize your content and reading experience through the use of cookies. You can turn off the use of cookies at anytime by changing your specific browser settings. I am not responsible for republished content from this blog on other blogs or websites without my permission. This privacy policy is subject to change without notice and was last updated on June 5, 2015. If you have any questions feel free to contact me directly at kimberlyfrencken@gmail.com


Is education truly valued?   I'm not so sure that education is a valued commodity. In cultures, other than the U.S., education is valued. It must be earned. Failing to do so is an embarrassment. Here, and I'm sure in other places, failure is someone else's fault.  Responsibility and Accountability have been replaced with Entitlement and Enabling. "Please help me" has been replaced with "Do it for me."  I don't operate that way. I worked long, hard hours to earn my degrees.  Granted my freshman year in college was quite an adjustment (to say the least), but after that year I realized that I was ashamed of failure- still am. I wanted to achieve. I wanted to do well. I didn't want to disappoint my parents or shame them. I knew if I failed that it was my fault. I had no one else to blame. Consequently, the education I earned was my education. No one could, or can,  steal it from me. 

I am so privileged every time I work with a student who takes pride  in their work and wants to achieve. Someone who wants to complete public school and attend college. Someone who understands that an education will open doors for them.  Let me rephrase that last comment. Education will open doors for you if you have the initiative to knock. No one is going to beat down your door because you aced the physics test. No one is going to ring your doorbell because your instructor said that you had potential. Everyone has potential. To do something. 

I had an interesting conversation with someone this week. Someone who stressed that they weren't afraid of work and realized that while they were in college they couldn't be picky. Their job choices were limited because of their school hours, but working was important because they would be networking with others and, hopefully, opening doors in preparation for graduation. Smart thinking!  I did the same (not that I thought I doing the smart thing. I needed to work, so I worked). While I was in college I worked on campus and during summers off I worked at a job in the field in which I planned to make my career.  I was a reliable and dedicated employee which earned a recommendation for my first job. I appreciated my manager providing such a valuable reference. Without my work history and my manager's reference, I wouldn't have landed such an awesome job right out of college. It took both my degree to qualify me and my work ethics to speak for me. 

There is something to be said for work. Hard,honest work. Being dedicated and motivated. Add those qualities to an employee with an education and you have a keeper. Notice the combination. Experience + Education. Nothing is more frustrating to me than to hear a student talk about the high level job they are going to get as soon as they graduate. No entry level job for them!  Then, when it doesn't happen,  they are disappointed and think that an education isn't important and the college failed them. Well, no one failed them. They failed themselves by believing the lie. You have to demonstrate that you can put your book knowledge to work. Show those skills. Being book smart can't replace common sense or self-motivation. Put your education to work.  

As educators, we want education and ourselves to be respected and valued.  We can help our 'cause' by educating our students in real-world thinking. First, no one is going to give you anything. You need to earn it. And, let's use that term. Earn. We don't give our students an education, nor do we give them grades. They must earn them. Secondly, it is up to the student to  use their  education. There are no limits. Only the boundaries they place on themselves. A diploma sitting on a shelf won't do much good. Dust it off. Discover your potential. 

So... is an education valuable? I think that it is the most valuable thing you can provide for yourself. But, don't provide the education without the experience or the willingness to use it. An education is only as good as the person who applies what they know. 



Getting ready for back -to-school?  Or is it too early to think of that!! 
When you are ready... check out my TpT shop, Chocolate 4 Teachers
and my new set of substitute resources that make planning for a sub a breeze (or for days when you are just too frazzled to plan a lesson)!!!

Non-Fiction Passages about Shooting Stars

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Privacy Policy
This blog does not share personal information with third parties nor do I store any information about your visit to this blog other than to analyze and optimize your content and reading experience through the use of cookies. You can turn off the use of cookies at anytime by changing your specific browser settings. I am not responsible for republished content from this blog on other blogs or websites without my permission. This privacy policy is subject to change without notice and was last updated on June 5, 2015. If you have any questions feel free to contact me directly at kimberlyfrencken@gmail.com

I'm sure to step on toes today. Sorry in advance. I don't mean to, but I feel very strongly about this issue. The freedom of speech. We all have our own opinions, right? So, why are we so eager to censor others, just because we disagree with them.  This has made it to the news in different levels this week, but all alarming.

First, a student was denied his diploma because he did not read the speech prepared by school administrators. He wrote one thanking his mother and God. Apparently, this was unacceptable to school administrators and teachers. Later, he was given his diploma and an apology, but what did he learn from this instance? I hope that he learned that defending freedom, everyone's freedom, not just those who agree with you is important. He has already enlisted in the military so he apparently believes in fighting for freedom. I hope that all of the administrators and teachers that condemned him will appreciate his service which protects their freedom. What was also disturbing to me was the fact that the journalist reporting the incident lumped all educators into the same basket. According to the news media, we are all a bunch of closed minded individuals that do not applaud our students achievements if they disagree with us and we are not educating them to search for facts and express their opinions. That wouldn't describe me or many of my colleagues. Maybe he should meet some of the teachers I know.

On another level, a woman, wearing a Trump t-shirt, was ridiculed at a Starbucks. She left feeling humiliated. Did the associates forget that she was a customer? Did they think it was okay to print a message to her on her drink? I think they forgot that paying customers are the reason they have job. She did receive an apology from Starbucks, who stated that they will use this as a learning opportunity. Great. I just hope that they do. And, I hope that they instill in their employees a sense of respect regardless of the opinions of others.

Social media certainly hasn't been any help. We think that because we are safe behind our computer screens that it makes it okay to trash someone. We unfriend and block people without giving it a second thought.  Ranting and raving is the norm for some. I don't get it. If you don't like my posts or what I have to say, scroll on by. I'm not forcing you to read it or agree with it. And, please don't call me names. You don't know me. You only read my  FB posts and judge me. I'm not judging you, nor am I being childish and blocking you. I'm reading and, if I don't agree, I respectfully scroll on by.

That is what is missing. Respect. The ability to agree to disagree. It will come as a shock to some that we don't all agree. That doesn't make you right and me wrong. It makes us different. That is what makes us a great nation. We all think for ourselves and forge new ideas and make discoveries. By working together we can do things we could never do alone. Disagreement makes us dig deeper, have a better understanding of what we believe and why we believe it. Disagreement helps us find the bugs in a plan and work them out. Disagreement that results in arguments, violence, depictions of violence, or some other equally immature way only deepen the problem. These methods are not solutions.

Are responsibilities being taught in school, along with freedoms? Do people, young and old alike, realize that with all of our rights we have responsibilities?  Apparently not.  We've crossed the line between socially acceptable and downright disgusting. Are we teaching students what the Constitution and Bill of Rights says or what we want it to say? Do we have the right to force our interpretations on a captive audience? NO. We don't have the privilege of enforcing our ideology in the classroom. We are modeling behavior for impressionable young people that we are teaching how to think for themselves. How to explore and research. Don't believe everything you read or see. We all know the old adage, "You can't yell 'Fire' in a crowded theater." But, do we know the legality behind it and, more importantly, are we teaching it?  You see.. this is the responsibility part. It goes hand in hand with the rights part.  We can't have one without the other. We want our kids to grow up to be independently thinking, mature adults that express themselves wisely. We can do this by teaching the whole picture, not just the one that agrees with us.  After all, it isn't about me. It is about my students and their future.

What freedom is all about! 


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